Data Sources

Water Risk Data

Name Description Where to Get It Significance
Map Service Authoritative Source
Total Water Level (0-20 ft) This dataset illustrates the scale of potential flooding, not the exact location, and does not account for erosion, subsidence, or future construction. Inundation is shown as it would appear during the highest high tides (excludes wind driven tides). The dataset should be used only as a screening-level tool for management decisions. As with all remotely sensed data, all features should be verified with a site visit. Total Water Level Map Service Total Water Levels
Sea Level Rise (0-10 ft.) This dataset was created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's efforts to depict potential sea level rise and its associated impacts on the nation's coastal areas. The purpose of the mapping viewer is to provide coastal managers and scientists with a preliminary look at sea level rise and coastal flooding impacts. The purpose of this dataset is to show potential sea level rise inundation above current Mean Higher High Water (MHHW) for the area.This dataset illustrates the scale of potential flooding, not the exact location, and does not account for erosion, subsidence, or future construction. Inundation is shown as it would appear during the highest high tides (excludes wind driven tides) with the sea level rise amount. The dataset should be used only as a screening-level tool for management decisions. Sea Level Rise Map Services NOAA Office for Coastal Management An online mapping viewer depicting potential sea level rise and its associated impacts on the nation's coastal areas
HAND Inundation Model FINAL DRAFT This dataset illustrates the scale of potential inundation due to rainfall events causing riverine and coastal flooding. This data is considered FINAL DRAFT and may change in its final iteration. The dataset should be used only as a screening-level tool for management decisions. As with all modeled data, all features should be verified with a site visit. HAND Map Service Oak Ridge National Laboratory Statewide inland inundation modeling.
NJ Climate Adjusted Flood Elevations (CAFE) To aid in NJDOT planning purposes, a GIS layer mapping the state recommended Climate Adjusted Flood Elevation (CAFE) of 3' above the existing 1% Annual Chance/100 year FEMA Floodplain was generated. The CAFÉ layer was generated using geospatial analysis on ArcMap. The A and AE zones were extracted from the FEMA FIRM layers (best available downloaded in 2020 and 2021). The existing elevation was extracted from the USGS NED 3m DEM (digital elevation model NAVD 88) along the FEMA mapped boundary. This elevation was incremented by 3 feet and extrapolated spatially outward using the ARCMAP Spatial Analyst EXPAND function. This CAFE-adjusted elevation map was compared with the DEM to identify where it equated the terrain elevation. The area between this new boundary and the existing floodplain boundary was classified as the CAFÉ zone, i.e., the area that would be inundated by 3' of additional flood height. The resulting map layer was then filtered using a 5x5 majority smoothing function to remove “salt and pepper” and smooth boundaries. Rutgers ORA Map Service Rutgers Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis NJ CAFE (1% Annual Flood + 3ft)
NFHL Effective FIRMs 041720 FEMA provides access to the NFHL through web mapping services. The NFHL is a computer database that contains FEMA’s flood hazard map data. The data depict effective flood hazard information and supporting data used to develop the information. The primary flood hazard classification is indicated in the Flood Hazard Zones layer. FEMA Flood Zones Map Service Federal Emergency Management Agency(FEMA) Established FEMA Flood Zones
Preliminary FIRM 042221 The Preliminary NFHL dataset represents the current pre-effective flood data for the country. These layers are updated as new preliminary and pending data becomes available, and data is removed from these layers as it becomes effective. Preliminary data are for review and guidance purposes only. By viewing preliminary data and maps, the user acknowledges that the information provided is preliminary and subject to change. Preliminary data are not final and are presented in this national layer as the best information available at this time. Additionally, preliminary data cannot be used to rate flood insurance policies or enforce the Federal mandatory purchase requirement. FEMA will remove preliminary data once pending data are available. FEMA Flood Zones Map Service Federal Emergency Management Agency(FEMA) Preliminary FEMA Flood Zones
Sandy Surge Extent The Sandy Surge data were created from field-verified High Water Marks (HWMs) and Storm Surge Sensor data from the USGS through 14-February 2013. HWMs and Surge Sensor data are used to interpolate a water surface elevation, then subtracted from the best available DEM, to create a depth grid and surge boundary by state. (description text source: FEMA MOTF website) Sandy Surge Extent Map Service FEMA Modeling Task Force (MOTF) Sandy Surge Extent
SLOSH Cat 1-4 The Sea, Lake and Overland Surges from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model is a computerized numerical model developed by the National Weather Service (NWS) to estimate storm surge heights resulting from historical, hypothetical, or predicted hurricanes by taking into account the atmospheric pressure, size, forward speed, and track data. Maximum of Maximum or Maximum of MEOWs (MOM) SLOSH data is used. A MEOW is defined as a Maximum Envelope of Water, which is generated by compositing several hypothetical SLOSH runs, each of which has the same category, forward speed and direction. This process results in a SLOSH grid that can be compared to the elevation grid. Digital elevation data is collected and an elevation surface created. SLOSH CAT 1-4 Map Service National Hurricane Center - NOAA Sandy Surge Extent
Impervious Cover National Land Cover Database Percent Developed Impervious. Impervious Cover Map Service Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium Displays percentage of impervious surfaces
Canopy Cover National Land Cover Database Tree Canopy Cover Canopy Cover Map Service Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium Displays tree canopy cover
Combined Sewer System Outfall Sites This is a geographical representation of the locations of CSO outfall points statewide. Combined Sewer Overflows (CSO) are sewers that are designed to collect rainwater runoff, domestic sewage, and industrial wastewater in the same pipe. Most of the time, combined sewer systems transport all of their wastewater to a sewage treatment plant, where it is treated and then discharged to a water body. During periods of heavy rainfall or snowmelt, however, the wastewater volume in a combined sewer system can exceed the capacity of the sewer collection system or treatment plant.This map data layer provides information regarding the location of permitted CSO Outfall Points, the applicable NJPDES Permit number, the assigned 3-digit discharge serial number, the latitude and longitude, the alternate name (such as a street address) of the CSO point, the municipality and Watershed Management Area (WMA) where the CSO outfall is located, a unique identifier for each point consisting of the permit number and outfall number, the receiving waterbody, the receiving treatment plant name and permit number, if the CSO outfall has solids and floatable treatment, a link for Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data, and a website. NJ Webmap Utilities Map Service NJ DEP NJDEP's Utilities data for publication and use in public applications.
MS4 Outfall Sites MS4 Outfall Sites NJ Webmap Applications Map Service NJ DEP NJDEP's data for publication and use in public applications.
Known Contaminated Sites Note: This dataset is updated daily. The Known Contaminated Sites List (KCSNJ) for New Jersey are those sites and properties within the state where contamination of soil or ground water has been confirmed at levels equal to or greater than applicable standards. This list of Known Contaminated Sites may include sites where remediation is either currently under way, required but not yet initiated or has been completed. The KCSLNJ layer has now been modified such that the information portrayed in the GIS layer is updated on a daily basis through a SQL query of NJEMS/Masterfile. Generating the KCSL GIS layer on a daily basis via an SQL query allows for a dynamic KCSL layer. This is critical for the general public and SRP regulated community by allowing them to see the most up to date information for a known contaminated site in a GIS format via NJ Geoweb.A "live" KSCNJ report can also be viewed via Data Miner at: 1) Go to https://www13.state.nj.us/DataMiner 2) Select Search by Category 3) Select Site Remediation then Submit 4) Under General, select The Known and Suspected Sites by County for a listing of Known Contaminated Sites by County. Information concerning individual contaminated sites can be viewed via other dataminer reports based on the Site ID or the SRP Preferred Interest # for the SRP case associated with that site. A small number of sites in the KCSL have no X/Y coordinates as of this date and therefore are not included in the GIS version. These sites do appear on the above in the tabular reports. Coordinates for the GIS version of the KSCL were largely "front door" locations acquired via "address matching" or which is an approximation of the facility front door. Many of these locations were also gathered by the Department using GPS and although these tend to be much more accurate, mistakes are sometimes made. Current protocol for assigning site locations defer to the center of the site or center of facility. Since errors can occur, users are encouraged to notify BIS of any these or any other inaccuracies in the KCSNJ through email to srpgis@dep.nj.gov. For guidance in how to report errors see the 'Supplemental Information' section below. NJ Webmap Environmental Map Service NJ DEP NJDEP's Environmental NJEMS data for publication and use in public applications.
EPA Cleanup Sites Accidents, spills, leaks, and past improper disposal and handling of hazardous materials and wastes have resulted in tens of thousands of sites across our country that have contaminated our land, water (groundwater and surface water), and air (indoor and outdoor). EPA and its state and territorial partners have developed a variety of cleanup programs to assess and, where necessary, clean up these contaminated sites. CIMC (www.epa.gov/cimc) brings together the data from many of these cleanup programs and lets people map, list and access cleanup progress profiles for sites across the US so that people can know what is going on in their communities. The CIMC web service provides access to the mapping component of the CIMC web application. The Cleanups in My Community (CIMC) web service contains the following map layers: Incidents of National Significance (from the epa.gov website) – with links to the relevant web pages, Superfund NPL sites (propose, final and deleted)(from CERCLIS – soon to be SEMS) – with links to the cleanup profiles, RCRA Corrective Action Sites (by various cleanup categories)(2020 baseline facilities only, not all RCRA sites because RCRA sites that are not corrective action are not cleanups)(from RCRAInfo) – with links to the cleanup profiles, Brownfields Properties (by grant type)(from ACRES) – with links to the cleanup profiles, Brownfields Grant jurisdictions (polygons)(from ACRES) – with links to the grant information, Federal facilities that are also Superfund or RCRA CA sites and BRAC (from the epa.gov page for federal facilities), Recovery Act locations (for Superfund and Brownfields only) (from CERCLIS and ACRES), Emergency removals (from EPAOSC.net). For context we also include: American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian (AIANNH) Areas (US Census), Congressional Districts (113th Congressional District TIGER/Line Shapefiles 2010), Impaired Waters – with links to additional data (OW web service), NPDES permitted facilities (US EPA WATERS mapping service) – with links to Waters, Water Monitoring Stations (US EPA STORET) – with links to monitoring data, Air Non-attainment areas for 7 categories (US EPA/OAR web service),Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) sites (US EPA TRI database) – with links to US EPA Envirofacts reports. We are open to new ideas on how CIMC services can be improved. Please contact us (http://www2.epa.gov/cleanups/forms/contact-us) to communicate your ideas to us. EPA Cleanup Map Service US EPA EPA Cleanup Sites
Areas Served by Water Systems with Lead Action Level Exceedances Water systems that exceeded the US EPA Action Level for lead in any sampling round in 2019 in accordance with the federal Lead and Copper Rule (LCR). JWW Water Equity Map Service New Jersey Public Community Water Supply Purveyor Water systems with exceedances in lead levels.
Estimated Lead Service Lines by Water Service Area This dataset shows the estimated number of lead service lines in each drinking water system's service area. The lead service line data is originally from NJDEP and it is accessible through Jersey WaterCheck through the metric: “Number of drinking water service lines reported to be made of or contain lead (system-level).” Note that these numbers are self-reported by utilities and many are estimates rather than precise values. Lead Service Lines by Water Service Area Map Service Jersey Water Check Similar to the layer that indicates water systems with lead action level exceedances, this is a relevant water risk layer. Areas with the highest numbers of lead service lines deal with drinking water risk that would exacerbate water risks in a given area.
Water Supply Parameters The Assessment Unit (AU) Level Water Supply Assessment Results incorporates the water quality results for all monitoring stations associated within an AU that is included in the 2016 NJ Integrated Water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Report (Integrated Report). This data represents the assessment results in NJ's 817 AUs with fresh water to determine if the Water Supply designated use was attained and the results for the 47 water quality parameters associated with the designated use. If an AU includes more than one station, the results for each parameter are combined with the ‘worst case’ station assessment representing the AU. That is if any of the stations are impaired for a parameter, then the parameter is impaired at the AU level. If some stations are fully attaining for a parameter but others have insufficient data, the parameter is fully attaining. The data reflects which of three assessment results each assessment was assigned: Attaining- Fully Supporting, Insufficient Data- Insufficient data was available to assess, Non-Attaining- Non-Supporting. Because of the large number of parameters associated with Water Supply, if a parameter had insufficient data for an assessment throughout the state then the parameter was removed from the file. The result was a reduction from 65 parameters to 47 parameters that had sufficient data for an assessment. NJ Webmap Environmental Monitoring Map Service NJ DEP NJDEP's Environmental Monitoring data for publication and use in public applications.
Aquatic Life Parameters The Assessment Unit (AU) Level General Aquatic Life Use Assessment Results incorporates the water quality results for all monitoring stations associated within an AU that is included in the 2016 NJ Integrated Water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Report (Integrated Report). This data represents the assessment results in NJ's 958 AUs to determine if the General Aquatic Life Use designated use was attained and the results for the 22 water quality parameters associated with the designated use. If an AU includes more than one station, the results for each parameter are combined with the ‘worst case’ station assessment representing the AU. That is, if any of the stations are impaired for a parameter, then the parameter is impaired at the AU level. If some stations are fully attaining for a parameter but others have insufficient data, then the parameter is fully attaining. The data reflects which of three assessment results each assessment was assigned: Attaining- Fully Supporting, Insufficient Data- Insufficient data was available to assess, Non-Support- Non-Supporting. NJ Webmap Environmental Monitoring Map Service NJ DEP NJDEP's Environmental Monitoring data for publication and use in public applications.

Demographic Layers

Name Description Where to Get It Significance
Map Service Authoritative Source
Affordability Stress by Water Service Area This dataset shows the percentage of households in each drinking water system's service area that may have difficulty paying water and sewer bills in the absence of subsidies. This metric is based on research from "A New Jersey Affordability Methodology and Assessment for Water and Sewer Utility Costs" (Van Abs, 2021) comparing 2020 water and sewer rates for both systems to the income of households at the top of the lowest quintile (20th percentile) of household incomes for each area, recognizing the cost of other typical household expenses. Such information can help utilities and communities to identify opportunities to provide assistance to low-income customers. Affordability Stress by Water Service Area Map Service Jersey Water Works This would be categorized as a Demographic layer, since it indicates affordability stress based on disposable income. Similar to the other demographic layers already on the map, it can indicate places that have higher financial barriers to solving water issues. However, it is unique because it is informed by a study that uses the 20th percentile income as well as disposable income, as opposed to median household income, as factors to determine potential household stress. This offers a different, perhaps more precise, way of assessing financial burden.
NJDEP Environmental Justice Overburdened Communities Overburdened community” means any census block group, as determined in accordance with the most recent United States Census, in which: (1) at least 35 percent of the households qualify as low-income households; (2) at least 40 percent of the residents identify as minority or as members of a State recognized tribal community; or (3) at least 40 percent of the households have limited English proficiency. Overburdened Communities Under S232 in New Jersey Feature Service NJ DEP Highlights overburdened communities across the state.
SVI Overall The Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) combines percentile rankings of US Census American Community Survey (ACS) 2014-2018 variables, for the state, at the census tract level and highlight the location of a community’s most vulnerable people. Demographic SVI Map Service Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Provides comparative index of overall vulnerability across the state.
SVI Socio-Economic and Individual Variables ATSDR’s Geospatial Research, Analysis & Services Program (GRASP) created Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Social Vulnerability Index (CDC SVI or simply SVI, hereafter) to help public health officials and emergency response planners identify and map the communities that will most likely need support before, during, and after a hazardous event. SVI indicates the relative vulnerability of every U.S. Census tract. Census tracts are subdivisions of counties for which the Census collects statistical data. SVI ranks the tracts on 15 social factors, including unemployment, minority status, and disability, and further groups them into four related themes. Thus, each tract receives a ranking for each Census variable and for each of the four themes, as well as an overall ranking. CDC 2018 SVI Map Service Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Provides comparative index of population vulnerability to factors such as poverty and employment.
SVI Minority/Language and Individual Variables ATSDR’s Geospatial Research, Analysis & Services Program (GRASP) created Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Social Vulnerability Index (CDC SVI or simply SVI, hereafter) to help public health officials and emergency response planners identify and map the communities that will most likely need support before, during, and after a hazardous event. SVI indicates the relative vulnerability of every U.S. Census tract. Census tracts are subdivisions of counties for which the Census collects statistical data. SVI ranks the tracts on 15 social factors, including unemployment, minority status, and disability, and further groups them into four related themes. Thus, each tract receives a ranking for each Census variable and for each of the four themes, as well as an overall ranking. CDC 2018 SVI Map Service Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Provides comparative index of population vulnerability based on minority status or difficulty speaking English.
SVI Household Composition/Disability and Individual Variables ATSDR’s Geospatial Research, Analysis & Services Program (GRASP) created Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Social Vulnerability Index (CDC SVI or simply SVI, hereafter) to help public health officials and emergency response planners identify and map the communities that will most likely need support before, during, and after a hazardous event. SVI indicates the relative vulnerability of every U.S. Census tract. Census tracts are subdivisions of counties for which the Census collects statistical data. SVI ranks the tracts on 15 social factors, including unemployment, minority status, and disability, and further groups them into four related themes. Thus, each tract receives a ranking for each Census variable and for each of the four themes, as well as an overall ranking. CDC 2018 SVI Map Service Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Provides comparative index of population vulnerability based on age and people with disabilities.
SVI Housing Type/Transportation ATSDR’s Geospatial Research, Analysis & Services Program (GRASP) created Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Social Vulnerability Index (CDC SVI or simply SVI, hereafter) to help public health officials and emergency response planners identify and map the communities that will most likely need support before, during, and after a hazardous event. SVI indicates the relative vulnerability of every U.S. Census tract. Census tracts are subdivisions of counties for which the Census collects statistical data. SVI ranks the tracts on 15 social factors, including unemployment, minority status, and disability, and further groups them into four related themes. Thus, each tract receives a ranking for each Census variable and for each of the four themes, as well as an overall ranking. CDC 2018 SVI Map Service Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Provides comparative index of population vulnerability based on housing characteristics and access to personal vehicles.
United Way Asset-Limited, Income-Constrained, Employed (ALICE) households Asset-Limted Income Constrained Employed (ALICE) households by municipality in New Jersey. Layers for both the percent of total households that are ALICE households and the total number of ALICE households are provided. United Way Map Service United Way of Northern New Jersey Asset-Limited, Income-Constrained, Employed Households
NJ DCA Municipal Revitalization Index Distress Score 2017 Municipal Revitalization Index Distress Score for New Jersey Municipalities. Higher index values indicate a higher level of distress. Refer to the NJ Department of Community Affairs score sheet for details. NJ DCA Map Service NJ Dept of Community Affairs Municipal Revitalization Index Distress Score
Redlining Redlining is a historic practice with present-day implications. During the 1930s and 1940s, several cities were mapped by the HOLC (Home Owners’ Loan Corporation) to assess neighborhoods based on the financial security of providing mortgages. Neighborhoods were graded in four categories (A, B, C and D), where A implied a minimal risk for investors and D, colored red, implied a “Hazardous” risk. The identification of hazardous neighborhoods was driven by several factors, including race, limiting the access to home ownership to African American communities and segregating cities. The data comes from The Mapping Inequality Project. Please note that areas without data mean that there is no data available, not that these areas were necessarily free of redlining. For more information on redlining, and its impacts in present day communities, you may explore this report by NCRC, explore this story map about the impacts of redlining in climate change risk in Elizabeth, NJ, or read “The Color of Law” by Richard Rothstein. JWW Water Equity Map Service Robert K. Nelson, LaDale Winling, Richard Marciano, Nathan Connolly, et al., “Mapping Inequality,” American Panorama, ed. Robert K. Nelson and Edward L. Ayers, accessed June 29, 2021, https://dsl.richmond.edu/panorama/redlining/ Identifies neighborhoods historically effected by real estate practices resulting in wealth inequality.

Areas of Interest

Name Description Where to Get It Significance
Map Service Authoritative Source
William Penn Foundation's Delaware River Watershed Initiative NJ Cluster Areas This file reflects modifications to the cluster boundaries that have taken place between June 5, 2013 and October 8, 2013. All cluster boundary modifications have been viewed and approved by the William Penn Foundation, Open Space Institute, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University and respresentatives from respective cluster groups. The following modifications have been made:Upper LehighRemoved: Sandy Run Creek, Black Creek, Nesquehoning Creek (all HUC12)Added: Portion of the Lehigh River HUCMiddle SchuylkillAdded: Portion of Outelaunee Creek, portion of Perkiomen Creek, portion of Manatawny Creek (all HUC 12)Schuylkill HighlandsAdded: Portion of the Schuylkill River HUCKirkwood CohanseyAdded: Portion of the Maurice River, portion of Salem River (both HUC12). JWW Water Equity Map Service Delaware River Watershed Initiative Clusters of watershed areas of significance to water quality protection efforts.
Municipalities in Which There Are Combined Sewer Systems , Combined sewer systems treat stormwater and wastewater using the same pipes. This leads to a risk of overflows during storms. JWW Water Equity Map Service NJ DEP Division of Water Quality Municipalities with CSOs that could have water quality impacts

Boundaries

Name Description Where to Get It Significance
Map Service Authoritative Source
NJ Government Boundaries This map serves out government entity boundaries and locations for New Jersey. The service contains multiple feature types and layers from a variety of sources. Scale of boundaries ranges from local to state. The service is published in NAD83 NJ State Plane coordinates, US Survey feet. Individual layer descriptions provide titles and file names that can be used to search the New Jersey Geographic Information Network catalog for metadata. Note to service users who incorporate service layer(s) into an application or published live map: The NJ Office of GIS, as publisher, would like to provide early notification of service changes that may affect the application or map. To do this, we need the name of the service layer(s) in use, name of application or map, and contact information for it, both technical steward(s) and business owner(s). In particular, please send email addresses for these parties, including any group email. The NJ Office of GIS can be contacted as follows: NJ Office of Information Technology, Office of GIS | njgin@oit.nj.gov | PO Box 212, Trenton, NJ 08625-0212 NJ Government Boundaries Map Service The State of New Jersey Municipal, county, and legislative boundaries for the state of New Jersey.